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Support: Aksara Jawa

Which iOS fonts support Javanese characters?

iOS 13 and later come with Noto Sans Javanese version 2, a reasonably functional Javanese font. iOS 10, 11, and 12 provided Noto Sans Javanese version 1, which many Javanese users find inadequate. The Aksara Jawa app therefore contains a beautiful Javanese font named “Yogya”, which can be installed from within the app. The font is based on the Pustaka font developed by Aditya Bayu Perdana and Arif Budiarto, but has been reengineered for iOS. Here are the three fonts in comparison:

comparison Yogya-Noto

Which characters are supported by the Yogya font?

The font supports all Javanese characters defined in the Unicode standard.

How do I make the Yogya font available to other apps?

To make the Yogya font available to other apps, go to the Font pane of the Aksara Jawa app, tap the “Yogya” button, and continue until the installation is done. In iOS 12.2 through 12.4.8, you’ll then also have to go to the Settings app, look for an entry “Profile Downloaded” near the top, tap it, then tap “Install”, and follow the steps to complete the installation of the Yogya profile until “Done”.

Do all iOS apps work with this font?

On iOS 13 and later, the Yogya font only becomes available in apps that let users choose fonts using an OS-provided font menu, including Pages, Keynote, Numbers, Notability, Affinity Designer, Photoshop, Clip Studio Paint. Users can then choose it from the font menu to apply it to Javanese text. All other apps on iOS 13 and later use Noto Sans Javanese version 2. On iOS 10, 11, and 12, the Yogya font becomes available to all apps, including Safari, Messages, and more; it effectively replaces Noto Sans Javanese version 1. Most iOS apps will work with the Yogya font once it’s available to them. One known exception is Microsoft Word, which uses its own and less capable font rendering.

Why does Javanese text render differently in other apps?

If you see Javanese text rendered differently in other apps than in the Aksara Jawa app, this can have different reasons. First, you have to make the Yogya font available to other apps, as described in “How do I make the Yogya font available to other apps?”. Second, on iOS 13 and later, the font only becomes available in apps that let users choose fonts, and users have to choose it from the font menu, as described in “Do all iOS apps work with this font?”.

Why can’t my friends see Javanese text that I post on social media?

You can post Javanese text either in the form of text, or in the form of an image.

If you post in the form of text, then to see that text displayed on their devices, your friends need to have a Javanese font installed, just like you:

To post as an image, type the text in the Aksara Jawa app, then tap the Share button. This creates an image and brings up a dialog that lets you choose what to do with the image.

Which characters are provided by the Javanese keyboard?

The Javanese keyboard provides all Javanese characters defined in the Unicode standard; this includes letters, marks, digits, and punctuation. The keyboard has five layers: commonly used characters, digits and punctuation, less commonly used characters, and two layers for pasangan.

How do I make the keyboard available to other apps?

To make the Javanese keyboard available to other apps, go to the Keyboard pane of the Aksara Jawa app, and follow the instructions there.

Why does the keyboard show some characters in color?

Several Javanese digits look like Javanese letters, for example, the digit one, , looks like the letter (ga). However, in Unicode digits are separate characters, and some software, such as spreadsheets, may depend on the distinction. The keyboard therefore highlights the digits in color.

Other questions?

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